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Mental Health Treatment of Children and Adolescents – Video Presentations from Penn State

Presentations from Penn State psychiatry faculty – most about 30 minutes Autism Spectrum Disorders – Raman Baweja, MD Disruptive Behaviors in Children and Adolescents – Usman Hameed, MD Mental Health Services in Schools: An Overview for PCP’s – Richard Mattison, MD Treatment of Depression and Suicide Prevention – Lidija Petrovic-Dovat, MD Treatment of ADHD in the Primary Care Setting – James Waxmonsky,...

Press Release – National conference on child maltreatment to advance innovation through data solutions

This year Penn State’s Seventh Annual conference focuses on childhood well-being through its Child Maltreatment Solutions Network and is asking others to be leaders, too. The Penn State Solutions Network’s annual network conference focused on “Strengthening Child Safety and Wellbeing through Integrated Data Solutions,” and featured over 16 nationally and internationally recognized experts in the field of child maltreatment. Held on Sept. 27 and 28 at the University Park campus, the conference hosted researchers, policy makers, child welfare professionals and members of the public. The use of technology and data-driven innovations now and over the next few years provides the leading edge in service delivery and care for children. This helps and empowers the organizations and groups in the public and private sector that work with children and families. Understanding and knowing the power of integrated data solutions brought dozens of experts and a broad range of community leaders from around the country to University Park. The conference featured sessions from leaders in the field of child maltreatment and welfare, including Penn State Professor and Solutions Network Director Jennie Noll; University of Southern California Professor Emily Putnam-Hornstein; University of Washington Professor Melissa Jonson-Reid; and University of Chicago Professor Fred Wulczyn among others. The conference looks forward and is geared toward collaborative conversation and problem-solving, making this a unique opportunity to engage with experts on these critical...

News Release – Children and adolescents admitted to psychiatric hospitals

ISP Conference on Mental Health Services features findings of a study suggesting the risks of shortening the length of stay for children and adolescents admitted to psychiatric hospitals.   WASHINGTON, Oct. 6, 2016 /ChildAdvocate/ — The ISP Conference on Mental Health Services provides a opportunity to learn, share, and network with researchers and leaders from around the world.  The Conference takes place at The Washington Hilton from October 6-9, 2016.   Today the conference features a study from Penn State University of College of Medicine that looks at whether shorter lengths of stay in psychiatric inpatient programs are associated with higher risks of readmissions for children and adolescents.  Other factors are also analyzed.  While psychiatric admissions for children and adolescent once were more than 30 days, changes in care and insurance restrictions have dropped that to just days.  While admissions of 14 days are now considered appropriate for many patients, approval can limit treatment to 24 hours in some cases.  The authors attempted to determine if this improved or compromised care.  Readmission rates of children having to return to the hospital are one measure as to the success of the program and more readmissions suggest that the care is not sufficient.  This study shows that the trend demonstrates that decreased length of stay is significantly associated with increased readmission rates when looking at 12 month increments.  The study included 3,896 children and adolescents admitted to inpatient psychiatric units at a large, multidisciplinary academic medical center during major changes in inpatient care from 1991-2003.  The average age was 10.7 years.  The findings are consistent with clinical impressions that readmissions increased as a direct result of...

SSRI Syndrome: A Review of Cases

Jimmy O. Ibikunle, M.D., Penn State College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 1. Recognize constellation of signs and symptoms for diagnosis of serotonin syndrome. 2. Demonstrate understanding of pharmacokinetics pertinent in medication management with serotonergic agents. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic, potentially fatal hyperserotonergic state.(1) It has been reported at initiation, in overdose and combination of serotonergic agents. It also occurs in recreational substance abuse Sternbach’s diagnostic criteria(1) include autonomic, neuromuscular and cognitive symptoms and signs. Method: A retrospective chart review of toxicology consults at a university medical center for reported or suspected overdose and drug interactions involving at least one known serotonergic agent(2) was done. Individuals with substance intoxication and animal bites were excluded. Results: Of the 173 cases, over a 5-year period, 5 met criteria(1) for serotonin syndrome, constituting 2.89%. Mean age was 34.4. Four patients were female. One required ICU stay; others were discharged within 24 hours; all survived. Three cases occurred in the course of medication adjustments: switching from fluoxetine to trazodone, augmenting fluoxetine with Lithium and simultaneously increasing doses of fluoxetine and trazodone. Two cases involved intentional overdose: one with venlafaxine and the other with sertraline; the latter followed a recent switch to fluvoxamine. Cognitive symptoms were the most common initial presentation. Conclusion: Occurrence during medication changes supports an iatrogenic etiology. No cases involved a MAOI, notorious for its precipitant effect, and fluoxetine’s pharmacokinetics(2) suggests its predisposition. References: Sternbach H. The serotonin syndrome. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1991;148:705-13. Mills KC. Serotonin syndrome. American Family Physician, 1995;25:1475-82. Additional information from the author at...

Smoking during Pregnancy

Exposure to Tobacco During Pregnancy Affects Behavior in Newborns (The Nemours Foundation) According to a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 12% of women who gave birth during 1999 smoked during pregnancy. Smoking during pregnancy passes nicotine and other dangerous substances to the fetus and increases the risk of stillbirth, birth defects, low birthweight, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and cancer. Maternal smoking has also been shown to affect the developing nervous system of the fetus. Researchers from Brown Medical School in Providence, Rhode Island, examined the effects of maternal smoking on a newborn’s body functions and behavior. Shortly after delivery in the hospital, the mothers of 56 full-term infants answered questions about their use of cigarettes during pregnancy and provided saliva samples to confirm their smoking or nonsmoking status. The mothers who smoked reported the number of cigarettes they smoked in a typical day of each trimester of pregnancy. Within 48 hours after birth, all of the infants underwent examinations of neurological and behavioral function, including tests for reflexes, central nervous system function, and visual function. In general, the infants who were exposed to tobacco were more excitable, had greater muscle tension, and showed other symptoms similar to infants going through drug withdrawal. Babies who had been exposed to tobacco needed to be picked up and touched more, and also showed more signs of physical stress in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, and visual system. The more cigarettes per day a mother smoked, the greater the effects on the newborn’s body functions and behavior. What This Mean to You: Smoking during...
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